100 Resilient Cities

Helping cities around the world become more resilient to physical, social, and economic shocks and stresses

Overview


In 2013, The Rockefeller Foundation pioneered 100 Resilient Cities to help more cities build resilience to the physical, social, and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century. Cities in the 100RC network have been provided with the resources necessary to develop a roadmap to resilience along four main pathways:

To date, more than 1,000 cities have applied, and 100 cities have been selected, to join the Network—representing more than one-fifth of the world’s urban population. Currently, more than 50 holistic Resilience Strategies have been created, which have outlined over 1,800 concrete actions and initiatives. This has resulted in more than 150 collaborations between partners and cities to address city challenges, including $230 million of pledged support from platform partners and more than $655 million leveraged from national, philanthropic, and private sources to implement resilience projects.

After more than six successful years of growing and catalyzing the urban resilience movement, the existing 100 Resilient Cities organization concludes on July 31, 2019. On July 8, 2019, The Rockefeller Foundation announced an $8 million commitment to continue supporting the work of Chief Resilience Officers and member cities within the 100RC Network. This new funding will enable a new project to continue supporting the implementation of resilience initiatives incubated through the work of 100RC.

 

Recent Updates

Mar 03 2021
Blog Post
Designing Technology for Easier, More Equitable Access to the Safety Net
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Mar 01 2021
Press Releases
Founders First Capital Partners Announces Initial Close of $9 Million Series A to Support Underrepresented Entrepreneurs, Underserved Communities
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Feb 28 2021
Press Releases
Statement by Dr. Rajiv. J. Shah, President of The Rockefeller Foundation, on the FDA Approval of Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Biotech Vaccine for Emergency Use
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